Global perspectives on research co-production with communities: ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies

Location
University of Birmingham
United Kingdom

More Information

social-equity@unimelb.edu.au

In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in community-engaged research conducted both inside and outside the academy. This interest raises critical ontological, epistemological, methodological, political and ethical issues that are associated with conducting rigorous research and maximising the benefits of research for communities. For many academics, the aims of working collaboratively and cooperatively with community-based partners, has supported a widespread push to commodify the services of higher education institutions and promote closer ties between universities, publics and industry.

This timely interdisciplinary conference, jointly organised by the University of Birmingham’s Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRiS) and the Melbourne Social Equity Institute will bring together world leading academics, practitioner and community researchers to focus on the opportunities and challenges of community engaged research. The conference will explore innovative models and methods adopted as part of community-based initiatives and university-community partnerships and will provide a platform to consider a range of theoretical, methodological and ethical issues in order to advance thinking and help enhance the impact of community engaged research projects.

The conference will be held at the University of Birmingham on 14 and 15 September 2017.  

It will feature two keynote speeches from renowned experts on community engagement:  

  • Professor Angie Hart – Professor of Child, Family and Community Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton
  • Professor Teresa Cordova – Director of Great Cities Institute, University of Illinois at Chicago and also Professor of Urban Planning and Policy at the College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs (CUPPA)

The conference will also feature invited plenaries, academic and practitioner panels, provocations and art-based activities, and a poster display on topics at the forefront of community-engaged research.  We welcome community-based practitioners and researchers, policy makers and academics from a range of disciplines including, anthropology, sociology, social policy, geography, linguistics, psychology, economics, business, medicine, demography, politics and development studies to submit panel proposals on innovative and varied aspects of research co-production with communities. We also encourage panel proposals from doctoral researchers.

Call for Papers

The conference will feature invited plenaries, academic and practitioner panels, provocations and art-based activities, and a poster display on topics at the forefront of community-engaged research.  We welcome community-based practitioners and researchers, policy makers and academics from a range of disciplines including, anthropology, sociology, social policy, geography, linguistics, psychology, economics, business, medicine, demography, politics and development studies to submit panel proposals on innovative and varied aspects of research co-production with communities. We also encourage panel proposals from doctoral researchers.

Following a call for panel proposals in December 2016, a number of full panels have already been accepted with papers relating to the following headings:

  • Privileging indigenous knowledge: advances in community based participatory action research (CBPAR);
  • Co-produced research with liminal communities;
  • Artistic sociological approaches to explore relationships with place;
  • Ontological and methodological challenges associated with community engaged research.
  • The strengths and challenges of co-producing research: experiences of collaborations between university-based researchers and people with disabilities. 
  • Multi-stakeholder participatory action research: what happens when the community, the University and the Council work together for social change
  • Resilience for health in changing cultures

People interested in submitting a paper to be presented at the conference can submit abstracts to an open submission stream. Papers that are accepted for presentation will be allocated to sessions by the conference convenors.

You can also consider submitting abstracts to be considered for presentation in thematic panels. Papers that cannot be included in nominated panels will automatically be considered for inclusion in the open submission stream.

Paper submissions are also encouraged to address topics across three broad themes:

  • Analyses of current political, philosophical, social and institutional contexts for conducting community-engaged and co-produced research;
  • Exploring the perspectives of community-based researchers, partners and practitioners towards the value and challenges of co-produced research;
  • Discussions of co-produced research that reflects on diverse research contexts, involves developed innovative methodologies or which raised critical ethical issues;

The ‘open submission’ stream invites contributions for those who wish to present a paper on a topic that does not clearly align with the agreed panel sessions or the three broad themes detailed above. Selected papers will be grouped into panel themes to be convened by the conference organisers.

Abstracts for paper proposals (250 words max) should be submitted electronically by Wednesday 5 April using the online submission system on the IRiS website.